Even before being published by the Times of India, his photographs had already shaken the world thanks to the incredible springboard of social medias. Describing himself as a young, optimistic and feminist man, Sujatro Ghosh took pictures of women with cow masks for two months. As original as successful, this project is his own way to denounce women’s condition in India among other social inequalities. He accepted to tell us more about his entreprise.  

Thanks to the first picture from the project posted on Instagram on the 11th of June, Sujatro Gosh reached out to the world. Highlighting in the description his will to use art as a form of protest, he exposes the trigger of this project :

My art comes as a form of protest. In my country Cows are more important than a woman's life with more security. (Reference: Majority of Hindus believe cow as their holy animal and they worship it though Majority of Muslims consume it as a part of their daily meal.) The debate is never ending "Whether to consume or worship it" but gaining political benefits out of it is wrong. Why not let the people decide what they want to consume. I will be photographing women from different parts of the society. This is silent form of protest which starts from India Gate, one of the most visited sights in India. I would be more than happy if you reach out to me and want to get photographed or maybe join this form of protest. #RisingBeyondJingoism #WHPstandout #indiagate #cow #women #protest #womenpower #weekend #indiarising #workingwomen #live #animals #love #laugh #bluesky #standup #everydayeverywhere #indiaphotoproject #everydayindia #womenphotographers #myfeatureshoot

A post shared by Sujatro Ghosh (@sujatroghosh) on

These few lines made us want to learn more about it.

Can you introduce yourself, what is your background?

I am from Calcutta in India. I have studied journalism and mass communication in my graduation and then I have completed my post-graduation studies with still photography and visual communication. I have been working as an independent photographer for 5 years and I have been in many non profit organisations all over the world.

 

Panjim South Goa'17 Hello Goa !! The cow finally started travelling. Thank you so much for the love and support. In the meantime you can extend your support to us by contributing in our crowdfunding campaign to take this project across the country. (The link is in my bio.) < https://www.bitgiving.com/cowmask > I will be in Bangalore & Delhi, North East India soon. Anyone and Everyone willing to be a part of this project can reach out to me via Email (given on my bio) or maybe contact me through the social media platforms. #women #womenrights #humanrights #RisingBeyondJingoism #cowitself #white #goa #church #silent #misplacedpriorities #joinus #cow #protest #portrait #mumbai #humanrightswatch #igersgoa #magnumfoundation #getty #goatourism #pickmygoapic #everydayindia

A post shared by Sujatro Ghosh (@sujatroghosh) on

You take pictures of women wearing cow masks. This project carries out a feminist message and also denounces religious rivalries between Hindus and Muslims. How did you get the idea?

This project of mine reflects the social and political scenario in my country. I believe that in my country we are living in a situation where cows are more important than women in a way, so this is my own way of protesting. I came up with the idea when I realised my protest could only be a virtual one, because fighting with the extremist groups was never an option, fighting with them physically was never an option either. So yes this is my protest against it and that is how I took it. But I do not mean to bring out the religious devils and I do not mean to harm any religious beliefs either. It is completely about art and it is a collaboration with those women whom I am photographing. And that is how I am taking the project forwards so I do not mean to demean any religion or harm anyone’s belief.

You are only twenty three, does the Indian youth share your will for more equality?

I am twenty three, and yes the Indian youth believes in something! But I am trying to see that it is not only about the age group we are talking about, it is not only about people who are in their twenties. I have also met people who believe in what I am trying to depict and they are from each and every age groups. It starts with the seventeen years old whom I photograph, as well as the eighty years old woman I shot.

Most people think that feminism is a woman’s fight for their own rights. As a man, how do you feel concerned with it?

That is where the difference is! I do not think feminism is only for women to fight for their own rights. Feminism could also come from a man’s prospective. And that is what I am trying to portray. I am really glad about the fact that I could make my statement reach people all over the world. That is how probably we can change our own country and maybe that is how we can change our own world.

Why fighting this inequality more than any other that exists in India?

I would like to steer towards that this project is not only important for India. This project is also important for people all around the world and that can explain how the world reacted to it. As we can understand this project speaks about women in general and women all over the world. So yes, this project primary speaks about the inequality in India but it also shows the inequalities worldwide.

A crowdfunding project has enabled you to take pictures all around India the past few days. Would you like to fight against inequalities with your art in some other countries if you could?

I made this project a crowdfunding project as this is something which I am doing for the public. And obviously, without Funding rise it would have never be possible for me to just go out there and to do it all with my own money and travel all over India. As you may know, I have started the crowdfunding project because I got many requests from all around the country, and many requests of women who wanted to get photographed. So I wanted to make it a public project and take it forward. I have travelled quite a lot and travelled almost half of my trip with this crowdfunding project. So, yes I would like to go to other countries as well and also I have received offers from several other countries where they want me to come and take this protest forward. I’m looking forward to it, I am looking forward to collaborations as well.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVxRKNwF6Lf/?taken-by=sujatroghosh

Finally, as a young photographer how do you succeed to have such an impact on the world?

I am 23 and that is probably one of the impacts, one of the most important facts that comes out from the project. It actually portrays that it is not only about women who think about this kind of things. It comes from age group: I am the young generation speaking about the biggest problem in the world.

« So yes, as a 23 yo, as you can understand, I did not have that on the medias, so social media was my platform. »

Primary I have started this project from Instagram, which helped me to reach out to the mass. And I had a certain fount of following which are 22M at that point of time. That helped me to reach out to the mass and as soon as out on the leading publications of the world, like in India it was Times of India, and all of the world it was BBC, and then it just was a BOOM. And now almost I have thousand place publications in 50 countries in the world in hundred place languages.

On his last picture, the cow mask has disappeared but the protest is still there. In front of the gravity of the stories around this controversial animal, the accessory suddenly seems superfluous.

Neither his travel and his fight are not close to their end, but still he took time to answer us and we thank him.

 

© Nikow pour L'Alter Ego/APJ
© Nikow pour L’Alter Ego/APJ

Retrouvez la version de l’interview traduite en français !

Avant de se retrouver dans les pages du Times of India, ses photos ont fait le tour du monde grâce à l’incroyable tremplin des réseaux sociaux. Jeune, optimiste, féministe et activiste, comme il se décrit lui-même, Sujatro Ghosh photographie depuis deux mois des femmes coiffées d’un masque de vache. Aussi original que réussi, ce projet est sa façon de dénoncer, en autres, les inégalités sociales en Inde. Il a accepté de nous en dire plus.

C’est le 11 juin, en postant la première photo de son projet sur Instagram, que Sujatro Ghosh se fait connaître du monde. Signalant dans la légende qu’il souhaite utiliser son art comme un moyen de protester, il explique l’origine de ce nouveau projet :

My art comes as a form of protest. In my country Cows are more important than a woman's life with more security. (Reference: Majority of Hindus believe cow as their holy animal and they worship it though Majority of Muslims consume it as a part of their daily meal.) The debate is never ending "Whether to consume or worship it" but gaining political benefits out of it is wrong. Why not let the people decide what they want to consume. I will be photographing women from different parts of the society. This is silent form of protest which starts from India Gate, one of the most visited sights in India. I would be more than happy if you reach out to me and want to get photographed or maybe join this form of protest. #RisingBeyondJingoism #WHPstandout #indiagate #cow #women #protest #womenpower #weekend #indiarising #workingwomen #live #animals #love #laugh #bluesky #standup #everydayeverywhere #indiaphotoproject #everydayindia #womenphotographers #myfeatureshoot

A post shared by Sujatro Ghosh (@sujatroghosh) on

Dans mon pays, les vaches ont plus d’importance que la vie des femmes, elles sont plus protégées (ndlr : La majorité des Hindous considère la vache comme leur animal sacré et la vénère alors que la majorité des musulmans en consomme dans leur repas de tous les jours). Le débat n’en finit pas : “Plutôt les manger ou les vénérer ?” Mais en tirer des avantages politiques est mal. Pourquoi ne pas laisser les gens décider ce qu’ils veulent consommer ? Je vais photographier des femmes venant de différentes origines sociales. C’est une forme silencieuse de protestation qui commence à l’India Gate, l’un des monuments les plus visités en Inde.

Ce sont ces quelques lignes qui nous ont donné envie d’en savoir plus :

Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur vous, quel a été votre parcours ?

Je viens de Calcutta en Inde. J’ai étudié le journalisme et la communication de masse au lycée et j’ai poursuivi à la fac en photographie et communication visuelle. Je suis également photographe indépendant depuis 5 ans et je me suis investi dans beaucoup d’organisations caritatives partout dans le monde.

Votre projet réussit à porter un message féministe tout en dénonçant les rivalités religieuses entre hindous et musulmans. Comment en avez-vous eu l’idée ?

Mon projet reflète la situation sociale et politique de mon pays. Je pense que nous vivons en Inde dans une situation où, d’une certaine manière, les vaches sont plus importantes que les femmes. C’est donc ma façon à moi de protester. C’est en comprenant que je ne pourrais protester que de manière virtuelle que j’ai eu cette idée. Se battre contre les groupes extrémistes, se battre physiquement avec eux n’a jamais été une option. Alors oui, c’est ma façon de protester, c’est comme ça que j’ai décidé de le faire. Mais je ne veux pas déterrer les démons religieux et je ne veux pas non plus nuire aux croyances religieuses. Ce projet repose entièrement sur l’art, c’est une collaboration avec ces femmes que je photographie. C’est ainsi que je le fais avancer, je n’ai l’intention de nuire aux croyances de personne.

© Nikow pour L'Alter Ego/APJ
© Nikow pour L’Alter Ego/APJ

Vous n’avez que vingt-trois ans, la jeunesse indienne partage-elle votre combat pour l’égalité ?

J’ai 23 ans, et oui la jeunesse indienne croit en quelque chose ! Mais ce n’est pas seulement une question d’âge. Ce ne sont pas seulement des jeunes d’une vingtaine d’années, il y a des gens qui croient aussi en ce que j’essaie de faire et qui viennent de toutes les tranches d’âges. Ça commence par exemple à 17 ans avec cette fille que j’ai photographié, mais j’ai aussi photographié des femmes de 80 ans.

Beaucoup de gens pensent que le féminisme est un combat de femmes pour les droits des femmes. En tant qu’homme, pourquoi y prendre part ?

C’est là la différence ! Je ne pense pas que le féminisme ne concerne que les femmes qui luttent pour leurs droits. Le féminisme peut aussi venir d’une initiative masculine. Et c’est ce que j’essaie de représenter. Et je suis d’ailleurs très heureux d’avoir pu me faire entendre partout dans le monde. C’est comme ça que nous pouvons, probablement, changer notre propre pays et peut être aussi changer notre monde.

Les inégalités sont nombreuses en Inde. Pourquoi combattre celle-ci plutôt qu’une autre ?

J’aimerais montrer que ce projet n’est pas seulement important pour l’Inde. Il est aussi important pour le monde entier. On peut ainsi comprendre comment la planète a réagi. On comprend que ce projet parle des femmes en général, et des femmes du monde entier. Donc oui, le projet parle au départ des inégalités en Inde, mais il montre aussi les inégalités partout dans le monde.

Marine Drive Bombay'17 Hello Bombay !! The cow finally started travelling. Thank you so much for the love and support. In the meantime you can extend your support to us by contributing in our crowdfunding campaign to take this project across the country.(The link is in my bio.) < https://www.bitgiving.com/cowmask > I will be in Goa, Bangalore & Hyderabad, North East India soon. Anyone and Everyone willing to be a part of this project can reach out to me via Email (given on my bio) or maybe contact me through the social media platforms. #women #womenrights #humanrights #RisingBeyondJingoism #dancer #ballet #timelapse #monsoon #silent #misplacedpriorities #joinus #cow #protest #portrait #mumbai #humanrightswatch #magnumfoundation #getty #everydaymumbai #everydayindia

A post shared by Sujatro Ghosh (@sujatroghosh) on

Récemment, un projet participatif vous a permis d’aller prendre des photos à travers toute  l’Inde. Aimeriez-vous utiliser vos photos pour combattre les inégalités dans d’autres pays si vous le pouviez ?

J’ai fait de ce projet un projet participatif car c’est quelque chose que je fais pour le public. Et évidemment parce que ce n’était pas possible pour moi de juste partir, tout faire avec mon propre argent et voyager à travers l’Inde. Comme vous le savez peut-être, j’ai commencé ce projet participatif parce que j’ai reçu beaucoup de demandes, de partout dans le pays. Des demandes de nombreuses femmes qui voulaient être photographiées. Donc j’ai voulu rendre mon projet public et le faire avancer. J’ai beaucoup voyagé et la moitié de ce voyage, je l’ai faite grâce à la participation des gens. Alors oui, j’aimerais aussi aller dans d’autres pays. J’ai d’ailleurs reçu des offres de plusieurs pays qui veulent que je vienne donner de l’importance à ma protestation. Je suis impatient que cela arrive, j’ai hâte de faire des collaborations.

Finalement, en tant que jeune photographe, comment expliquez vous l’impact qu’a eu ce projet dans le monde ?

J’ai 23 ans et c’est probablement l’un des impacts, l’un des faits les plus importants qui émane du projet. En fait, cela montre que ce ne sont pas seulement les femmes qui réfléchissent à ce genre de choses. Ça vient d’une certaine tranche d’âge : je suis la jeune génération qui parle du plus gros problème qui existe dans le monde.

« Alors oui, en tant que jeune de vingt-trois ans je n’étais pas reconnu par les médias, donc les réseaux sociaux ont été ma plateforme. »

My art comes as a form of protest. In my country Cows are more important than a woman's life with more security. (Reference: Majority of Hindus believe cow as their holy animal and they worship it though Majority of Muslims consume it as a part of their daily meal.) The debate is never ending "Whether to consume or worship it" but gaining political benefits out of it is wrong. Why not let the people decide what they want to consume. I will be photographing women from different parts of the society. I would be more than happy if you reach out to me and want to get photographed or maybe join this form of protest. #RisingBeyondJingoism #misplacedpriorities #reflection #cow #women #protest #womenpower #smoke #indiarising #mirror #live #animals #love #laugh #art #bedroom #everydayeverywhere #indiaphotoproject #everydayindia #womenphotographers #myfeatureshoot

A post shared by Sujatro Ghosh (@sujatroghosh) on

Au départ, j’ai commencé le projet sur Instagram, ce qui m’a aidé à toucher la population. En plus, j’avais déjà un certain nombre d’abonnés ; maintenant ils sont plus de vingt-cinq mille. Ça m’a aussi beaucoup aidé à avoir plus d’impact. Puis dès que mon projet a été relayé par les principaux médias du monde, le Times en Inde, la BBC dans le monde entier, ça a été juste comme un BOOM ! Maintenant, j’ai été publié plus d’un millier de fois, dans cinquante pays à travers le monde et dans une centaine de langues.

Sur sa dernière photo, plus aucune trace de masque. Face à la gravité des témoignages autour de cet animal controversé, celui-ci semble soudain superflu, même si une vache est bien présente sur l’image.

Sujatro Gosh n’en a pas fini des sollicitations, de son voyage et surtout de son combat. Il a néanmoins accepté de nous éclairer sur ce projet et nous l’en remercions.